National City Police Department’s Senior Volunteer Patrol (SVP)

The following was found on the internet by the CWEB Chair. The original information has been re-formatted to accommodate our site. 

Come be a part of the National City Police Department’s Senior Volunteer Patrol (SVP). SVPs perform a variety of duties to enhance community safety and security through programs of crime prevention and education, coupled with active citizen involvement. SVPs perform non-hazardous duties which were previously handled by sworn police officers.

To become a member of the Senior Volunteer Patrol (SVP), you must be 50 years old or older, have a valid driver’s license, be law-abiding, and be able to pass a police background check. You do not have to live in National City to serve as an SVP in National City. For more information or to obtain an application, please contact  Sgt Julian Villagomez at (619) 336-4423 or email at jvillagomez@nationalcityca.gov.

What Are the Requirements? To become a member of the Senior Volunteer Patrol, you must meet the following minimum requirements:

  • 50 years of age of older

  • Valid driver’s license

  • Police background check

  • Interest in working with law

  • enforcement

The National City Police Department’s Senior Volunteer Patrol (SVP) performs a variety of duties to enhance community safety and security through programs of crime prevention and education. SVP’s perform non-hazardous duties which were previously handled by sworn police officers

Here are just a few of the duties performed by the SVP’s:

1.   Patrolling the city in a marked SVP vehicle and on foot to serve as the “eyes and ears” of the Police Department

2.   Vacation House Checks

3.   Traffic Control

4.   Neighborhood and Business Watch

Our thanks to the National City Police Department for sharing this information on the web.

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Does More Police Mean Less Crime[i]

History of COPS Hiring Program

The largest federal crime bill to date was signed by President Bill Clinton into law in September 1994 and known as the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act. The bill authorized $8.8B in spending on grants for state and local law enforcement agencies between 1994 and 2000 and created the office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS-NPO) that was responsible for the administration the grant funds. This crime bill created the COPS Universal Hiring Program (CHP), which covered 75% of the cost of new police hires for grant recipients. The grant award process was based on crime rate, citizen population, type of crimes reported using the UCR system under the jurisdiction of the applicant. The stated goal of the hiring grant program was to put 100,000 new police officers on the street. Continue reading

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Cat-and-mouse game: Customers demand cybersecurity, law enforcement wants easier access to evidence

abajournal.com
 
Jason Tashea

On March 6, the iPhone’s encryption became no match for the Indiana State Police.

Armed with GrayKey, a tool that circumvents iPhone passwords and encryption, the agency was able to plug into dozens of iPhones in its possession and collect previously unattainable information for ongoing investigations.

Want more information–click here.

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Some police dogs now have cameras, too

apnews.com
 
By CARRIE ANTLFINGER

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Police dogs have always helped their human counterparts through their eyes and nose, and now some of the dogs are getting their own backup — cameras that transmit live video.

The devices generally attach to dogs’ backs on a vest and transmit video to a handler watching from a screen, possibly on their wrist or around their necks. It’s so the officers can better assess what they are up against before they go into a situation.

Bark or woof here for page 2

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Program is a Dangerous Word in Police Work

officer.com

It may sound like a good thing to say: “We’re starting a new program.” But will it last? Or is it obviously another ‘feel good’ measure or political boondoggle? Think before using it. There are implications.

The chief or sheriff walks towards the podium with a smile ready to make an announcement. The media is in attendance focusing on the backdrop of the podium surrounded with local politicians and staff members. In the opening remarks, the “P word” is said – we are starting a new program.

And now for page two—click here.

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Dallas cops are working too much at off-duty jobs, says city audit

dallasnews.com

8-10 minutes

Dallas police officers are working too long and too often for off-duty employers, says a city audit released Friday.

In Dallas, officers can end up working longer hours at their off-duty jobs than in their actual police work, and their bosses often don’t stop them.

Other cities, according to the city audit, seriously limit how much cops can work off-duty.

Read entire story here.

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DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ANNOUNCES NEW ACTIVE SHOOTER TRAINING GRANT FOR FIRST RESPONDERS

 

WASHINGTON — Principal Deputy Associate Attorney General Jesse Panuccio, Director Phil Keith of the Department of Justice’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office), and Dr. Pete Blair, Executive Director of the ALERRT Center at Texas State University today announced an $8.7 million grant to provide multi-disciplinary, scenario-based active shooter training to first responders across the country. Continue reading

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